jalousie window

In by Mark Goodman

A type of window consisting of parallel glass, acrylic, or wooden louvers set in a frame, which are locked together onto a track and controlled by a crank mechanism so that they may be tilted open and shut in unison to control air flow through the window. Jalousie windows are popular in hot-humid climates.

jalousie window (Wikipedia)
Glass jalousie window and storm door, common on mid-20th-century homes in warm climates.
Wooden jalousies were chosen in 1946 by Ian Fleming for his Jamaica estate, Goldeneye
Glass jalousies viewed from outside.

A jalousie window US: /ˈæləs/ or louvre window (Australia, New Zealand, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, United Kingdom) is a window composed of parallel glass, acrylic, or wooden louvres set in a frame. The louvres are joined onto a track so that they may be tilted open and shut in unison to control airflow, usually by turning a crank.

« Back to Glossary Index